EcoFill

Play it Safe, Play it Smart.

100% performance, 0% crumb rubber.

Our Eco-Safe infill mimics the true evaporative cooling effects of a natural grass dirt-and-root system reducing surface temperatures by 35o or more. It is positioned deep down within densely packed blades of PrimePlay® Replicated Grass, virtually eliminating the infill fly-out that comes with traditional artificial turf products, allowing for true ball bounce, ball roll, and ball speed of the best natural grass fields.

FirstForm® offers different Eco-Safe infill options. Our completely rubber-free infill is a proprietary composite of organic and non-organic particles featuring Hydrated Coconut Husk, which provides the look and feel, and traction, of the best natural grass fields, and Zeolite, which holds 55% of its weight in water, releasing moisture throughout the hottest parts of the day.

We also offer a tunable infill featuring virgin EPDM rubber, which has been developed for high UV light resistance and offers industry-leading heat, ozone, and weather resistance.

No crumb rubber.

Our infill products contain no crumb rubber, removing the health and maintenance issues associated with those particles and making our Eco-Safe infill a leading industry option. Our infills are 100% environmentally friendly, recyclable, and contain no heavy metals, no polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and no butylated hydroxyanisole.

Tire Particulate Synthetic Turf & Children
Dr. Stuart Shalat, Sc.D., Harvard School of Public Health, Epidemiology-Physiology

The problem is tire particles breakdown over time into ultra-fine particles that are inhalable and respirable. There are chemicals in the particulates, including mercury, lead, benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and arsenic, among several other chemicals, heavy metals, and carcinogens that get absorbed into children.


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ESPN E:60 The Turf War: The Dangers of Crumb Rubber.

There are over 12,000 synthetic turf fields in the U.S., most of them contain ground up tires, called crumb rubber. Questions have been raised about these fields and a possible link to cancer. Julie Foudy explores the issue in this E:60 excerpt.
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